Showing 11 results

Authority record
Jewish Archives and Historical Society of Edmonton and Northern Alberta

Adler (family)

  • jhse
  • Family

Meyer Adler was born in New York in 1906. Meyer's wife, Lilly Spiegel was born in Poland in 1906 and came to New York in 1919. The Adlers were married in 1927 and came to Vegreville on their honeymoon to visit their uncle, Louis Berg. Meyer Adler, impressed with the countryside and the economic possibilities of the region, bought a confectionery store from Mr. Berg and went into business in Vegreville. Over the years, the Adlers operated several stores in Vegreville before opening Adler's Department Store in 1964. The Adlers had five children, Sid, Bernie, Eli, Ted, and Diane. All five children attended university at the University of Alberta in Edmonton. Bernie and Eli became dentists, Sid returned to Vegreville to run the Adler store, Ted became involved in the manufacture of furniture, and Diane became involved in real estate. Adler's department store closed in 1995 and Sid Adler retired to Edmonton. Meyer Adler passed away in 1979 and Lilly Adler died in 1985. Eli Adler married Phyllis Smordin, and they had four children. Phyllis was a Negev Dinner Honouree in 2005.

Baltzan (family)

  • jhse
  • Family

Jacob A. Baltzan was born in Leova, Bessarabia in 1873. After serving with the Russian Army, Mr. Baltzan immigrated to New York. His wife, Nina (Gershcovitz) and daughters Katie and Tosha joined him later in America. Dissatisfied with New York City, Mr. Baltzan moved the family to a Jewish pioneer colony near Lipton, Saskatchewan. Due to poor crops at the colony, the Baltzan's moved to Govan, Saskatchewan until finally settling in Edmonton. Once in Edmonton, Jacob Baltzan became actively involved in the city's burgeoning Jewish community, helping to establish the burial society Chevra Kadisha in 1913, and was a major force in the founding of Edmonton's Talmud Torah Day School, the first Hebrew Day School in Canada. Nina Baltzan was the founder of the Talmud Torah Mother's Auxiliary, was one of the founders of the Edmonton Section of the National Council of Jewish Women and the Ladies Chevra Kadisha. The Baltzan's had one son Hy, born in Edmonton in 1913. Through his activities in various Jewish organizations, Hy Baltzan would become one of the most prominent members of the Edmonton Jewish community. Hy Baltzan was president of B'nai Brith Lodge 732 and the Jewish Community Council, national and regional vice-president of the Canadian Jewish Congress, Founding president of the Jewish Senior Citizen's Drop-in Centre, chairman of the Community Council Archives, and served on the executive of several other community organizations. Hy Baltzan was Negev Dinner honouree in 1976. Hy Baltzan and his wife Celia had three daughters, Mrs. Jaclyn Schulman, Mrs. Gail Schloss, and Nina Baltzan.

Beth Shalom Synagogue

  • jhse
  • Corporate body

In 1928, a group of members of Beth Israel Synagogue, unhappy with the overcrowding of the synagogue during High Holiday services and with the blessing of the synagogue, began holding separate services in the Talmud Torah School building. In 1932, the congregation was incorporated as Beth Shalom Synagogue with J. Eisen as the congregation's first rabbi. In 1950, after considerable discussion, sod turning began on a new synagogue building at 11916 Jasper Ave. In 1951, services and activities began in the partially completed Beth Shalom building. Once the building was completed, it housed the synagogue along with a new Community Centre Association, a library, a theatre, and two full kitchens. With the founding of a Jewish Youth Centre and then a Jewish Community Centre in Edmonton, many of the activities that had taken place in the synagogue moved to the new facilities. In February 1980, an arson attack on the synagogue resulted in over $300, 000 in interior damages. Beth Shalom Synagogue is a conservative synagogue and a member of the Association of Conservative Synagogues of America.

Cantor, Max

  • jhse
  • Person

Dr. Maxwell Mordecai Cantor was born in Winnipeg on April 1, 1903. He obtained his B.Sc. degree from the University of Manitoba in 1924, and his M.D. in 1929. He pursued post-graduate studies at the Universities of Alberta and Toronto, at the Pratt institute in Boston and at Johns Hopkins in Baltimore. For nearly 40 years, Dr. Cantor taught at the University of Alberta. He held the position of Chief Coroner of Alberta for nearly thirty years, and served as Chief Coroner of the Yukon and Northwest Territories as well. Dr. Cantor received the Red Cross Gold Medal in 1941, the Centennial Medal in 1967, and a Government of Alberta achievement award for forensic medicine in 1972. He was a charter member of the Beth Shalom Synagogue and of Sigma Alpha Mu Fraternity. He married Edith Rose Secter of Winnipeg in 1936. Edith was long known as a patron of the arts in Edmonton. Max passed away in 1981, Edith in 2001. Their daughter Sharon Abbott is a graphic artist, and their son Paul is the Executive director of the Toronto International Leadership Centre for Financial Sector Supervision.

Cristall, Abe

  • jhse
  • Person

Born in 1868 in the Russian province of Bessarabia, Abe Cristall immigrated to Canada in 1890. After landing in Montreal, Mr. Cristall traveled west and worked as a farm labourer near Brandon, Manitoba and then Oxbow, Saskatchewan. Soon after arriving in Saskatchewan, Mr. Cristall began working as a peddler, selling bolts of cloth door-to-door in rural Saskatchewan. In the course of visiting a customer, Mr. Cristall met the customer's daughter, Rebecca Leavitt, and they were married in 1893. The newlywed couple planned to move to Seattle, but Mr. Cristall, after visiting and being enticed by the economic possibilities present, elected to settle in the booming frontier town of Edmonton instead. The Cristalls were the first Jewish residents of Edmonton. Abe Cristall opened his own draying business before becoming a prominent member of the city's economic elite through his involvement in the city's active real estate market. In 1909, Mr. Cristall financed and built the Royal George hotel in the city's downtown. The Cristalls had five children; George, Max, Rose, Jessie and Ted. Abe Cristall died in 1944.

Leibovici, Karen

  • jhse
  • Person

Karen Leibovici was born on May 27, 1952. She attended McGill University in Montreal, Quebec and graduated from there with a Bachelor and Master of Social Work, and a Diploma in Management. She moved to Edmonton, Alberta in 1980 and in 1993, was elected to the Alberta Legislature as Liberal MLA for the Edmonton-Meadowlark constituency, a position she held until 2001. She was also active in the Edmonton, Alberta community, being a founding member of the West End Transportation Advisory Committee, and a member of the Youth Emergency Shelter Society, the Social Planning Council Board, and the Chrysalis Business Advisory Council. She also served as chair of the Edmonton Taxicab Commission, was a Block Parent Coordinator and a volunteer for the Summerlea and Aldergrove Community Leagues. She was elected to Edmonton City Council in 2004, as representative for Ward 1. She married to Steve Zepp, and they had one son, Adam.

Miller (family)

  • jhse
  • Family

In 1897, Oseas Muhlstock (later Miller) left Budapest, Hungary for Canada, leaving behind his wife and three children. Oseas (d. 1951) arrived in Halifax and immediately took a job as a coal miner. After an explosion which caused him major hearing loss, he left for Montreal and opened a general store, and then sent for his wife Goldie Tilleman Miller (d. 1950) and children Jenny (d. 1976), Louis (d. 1977) and Abe (d. 1964). A fourth child, Jack (d. 1968), was born in Montreal. Daughter Jenny married Oseas Davis (d. 1977), a merchant from Edmonton. Louis went to McGill to study medicine, and graduated in 1920. He practiced medicine in Edmonton from 1928-1959. He married Rae, and they had two children: Joe, a doctor, and Joyce (McDonald). Abe quit school, and moved to Edmonton to work in the Davis general store. The rest of the family followed in 1915. Abe enrolled in Alberta College, and upon graduation was accepted in the first law class at the University of Alberta. Abe was the youngest lawyer of his day to be appointed King's Council. In the1950s, Abe became a member of City Council and later and MLA. He married Betty (Rebecca) Griesdorf (d. 1971). Together, they had three children: Tevie (d. 1996), Helen and Leon. Tevie and Leon became lawyers, Tevie eventually becoming the Associate Chief Justice of the Alberta Supreme Court, and Helen became a member of City Council.

Shnitka, Abraham

  • jhse
  • Person

Abraham Shnitka was born in Libau, Courland- Latvia (Russia) in 1894. During his youth in Libau, Mr. Shnitka trained as a printer's apprentice before immigrating to Canada and settling in Calgary with his family in 1911. After working in the printing trade in Calgary for two years, in 1913 he started Franklin Press, the first Jewish Job Printing Shop in Western Canada, with a full range of hand and linotype machine-set Hebrew alphabet type. Jewish institutions and organizations that were his clients included the Peretz Institute, Calgary Jewish Literary Club, Calgary Talmud Torah and others. In 1935, Mr. Shnitka sold the Franklin Press and became the King's and later Queen's Printer for the Province of Alberta from 1935 until his retirement in 1958. In 1939, he founded and was named director of the Alberta Government Purchasing Department, a position he held until 1942. In 1951, he was the organizer and Chairman of the Queen's Printers' Association of Canada. Upon his retirement in 1957, Mr. Shnitka resigned as director of the association and was named an honourary president. Upon retirement, Mr. Shnitka worked as a sales representative for printing equipment for Sydney R. Stone Ltd., Toronto. He was also an active member of several Jewish organizations and was a passionate supporter of Zionist causes. Mr. Shnitka and his wife Pearl (nee Friefeld) had one son, Theodore, a doctor in Edmonton. Mr. Shnitka passed away in 1972.

Results 1 to 10 of 11